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Beddington Farmlands: A premier urban nature
reserve for the Wandle Valley Regional Park

Beddington Farmlands is a 161 hectare (400 acre) site in the coreland of the wider Wandle Valley Regional Park. Together with the adjacent green spaces of Beddington Park and Mitcham Common, Beddington Farmlands forms one of the largest contiguous green spaces in south London.

Beddington Farmlands is an important area for wildlife and is classified a Site of Importance for Nature Conservation and Metropolitan Open Land (equivalent of Green Belt within an urban area). The site is being restored into a mosaic of important habitats for wildlife ahead of the development of a flagship nature reserve for people and nature.

“The ‘sleeping giant’ of London’s natural history world”
David Lindo, BBC broadcaster, writer and public speaker

Beddington Farm Bird Group

Beddington Farm Bird Group

Formed in 1992, the Beddington Farm Bird Group monitors breeding and wintering bird populations as well as migration at Beddington Farmlands. In addition, the bird group also carries out habitat management and restoration, working closely with site management. More »

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3 days ago

Isha Crichlow

Does anybody know if the white stork is still around? ... See MoreSee Less

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WINTER DUCKS AT BEDDINGTON FARMLANDS
Visit Beddington Farmlands during the winter to see the wild ducks looking their best. During the winter wild male ducks display (dancing and singing/calling) and attract females for breeding in the spring. There are also frequent scraps between the males fighting over females.

Different species of ducks that can be seen at Beddington Farmlands include (images below of adult males), Teal, Wigeon, Shoveler, Pintail (rare), Mallard, Gadwall, Pochard, Tufted Duck and Shelduck.
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1 week ago

Simon Starr

Hi folks, in the 1980's I spent a fair bit of time birding at Beddington SF, was a short bus trip from home.First visited in 1982, were lots of Short-eared Owls, Jack Snipe and Bramblings. Other highlights in the comings years were Spotted Crakes, Spoonbill, Grey Phalarope and Lesser Yellowlegs. A logbook was used by birders to report sightings. With a couple of friend's we put together a basic bird report for the farm for 1984. Managed to track it down and get some scanned copies for the record. Thought it would be of interest. From memory in '84 there were still many sludge beds, the gravel pits were being developed, but was before the landfill I think. Looking back at this I note that Tree Sparrows didn't get much of a mention, were pretty common then. with Arun Bose, Steve Dougill and Garry Messenbird ... See MoreSee Less

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White stork still present today ... See MoreSee Less

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1 month ago

Beddington Farmlands

Great White Egret, Grey Heron and Little Egrets (Zach Pannifer) ... See MoreSee Less

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Concerns have been raised about the health of the White Stork currently at the farmlands. The White Stork Project have been informed and the situation is being monitored. Fortunately the bird's condition does seem to be improving.

The White Stork Project also provided the following information on the history of this particular individual (copied below). (Thanks to Andy Wasley (photographs), Zach Pannifer, Charlotte Weddell and Claire Williams for information and contacting the Stork Project)

He is one of the individuals from our project who originally came from Poland. He was brought to the UK in early 2018 after sustaining an injury in the wild and rehabilitated at Warsaw Zoo before coming to our satellite site in East Sussex. He was released into the wild earlier this year. He was first spotted in Dartford with 2 other storks in mid July, since then he spent some time in Somerset and Dorset before returning to East Sussex briefly on 1st September. After a few days in Surrey he was then spotted in Hampshire where he spent about 3 weeks on the Somerley Estate in the New Forest and was first spotted at Mitcham Common on 18th October.
GB35 is still young (roughly 2 -3 years old) and will not start to pair up or breed until 2021/22. Hopefully when he reaches that age he will either return to one of our sites or find a mate elsewhere.
I hope you find this information interesting.
The sightings coming in are vital for the project to learn about how these birds are behaving post release and we are monitoring their movements closely.
You can find out more about the project via our website and keep up to date on our twitter account @ProjectStork

The White Stork Project Team
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I was glad to catch sight of the stork yesterday. Some internet searching revealed,

"GB35 is a male who is approximately 2.5 years old, he originally came to us in 2018 from Warsaw Zoo in Poland after being injured in the wild as a juvenile and rehabilitated. He joined the other storks here in one of our satellite pens in East Sussex before being released earlier this year. He was seen near Dartford, Kent, on 24th July after spending time near the release site in East Sussex".

A fellow birders photos showed what appeared to be some injuries and bald patches where feathers were missing but after reading about his history, I started to think maybe he's just battle worn. Either way, I hope he lives out the rest of his life in good health. ❤
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1 month ago

Charlotte Weddell

I was glad to catch sight of the stork yesterday. Some internet searching revealed,

"GB35 is a male who is approximately 2.5 years old, he originally came to us in 2018 from Warsaw Zoo in Poland after being injured in the wild as a juvenile and rehabilitated. He joined the other storks here in one of our satellite pens in East Sussex before being released earlier this year. He was seen near Dartford, Kent, on 24th July after spending time near the release site in East Sussex".

A fellow birders photos showed what appeared to be some injuries and bald patches where feathers were missing but after reading about his history, I started to think maybe he's just battle worn. Either way, I hope he lives out the rest of his life in good health. ❤
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Latest corporate video from Viridor about the restoration progress
www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSrBCkp67kE
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A special visitor today, a White Stork. This bird is from the Knepp Estate Re-wilding project. identified by it's blue ring GB35. At Knepp they are re-introducing White Storks into the wild where they are now successfully breeding in the wild. This bird has been seen in Wiltshire and was also on Mitcham Common this morning.

The bird can be seen from the Wet Grassland hide.

Photo by David Warren.
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1 month ago

Peter Alfrey

A special visitor today, a White Stork. This bird is from the Knepp Estate Re-wilding project. identified by it's blue ring GB35. At Knepp they are re-introducing White Storks into the wild where they are now successfully breeding in the wild. This bird has been seen in Wiltshire and was also on Mitcham Common this morning.

The bird can be seen from the Wet Grassland hide.

Photo by David Warren.
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2 months ago

Councillor Ben Andrew

Hi all. The next meeting of the CAMC is next Thursday. Are there any points or questions about the restoration of Beddington Farmlands which you would like me to raise with Viridor on your behalf?

Let me know here or on ben.andrew@sutton.gov.uk
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2 months ago

Beddington Farmlands

Common and Green Sandpipers are currently showing well from the Wet Grassland hide on the permissive path.

Common Sandpiper (image one) is smaller and browner than Green Sandpiper. In flight Common has typical fluttering flight with a bar through the tail.

Green Sandpiper (image two) appears more black and white than Common Sandpiper. In flight it shows a conspicuous white rump. One of the best features to separate the two species is the dark breast meets the wing with a straight edge on Green Sandpiper. On Common Sandpiper there is a prominent white gap between the brown breast and the wing.

Good luck with seeing them and telling them apart!

Photos by Arjun Dutta
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2 months ago

Beddington Farmlands

Latest roadmap from ViridorHere is Viridor's latest roadmap on the restoration of Beddington Farmlands.

On Wednesday we had the first Access Working Group meeting. We have asked that the Farmlands has access on par with other nature reserves and are waiting for a site visit to Thurrock Thameside Nature Park.
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2 months ago

Beddington Farmlands

Quite a rare visitor today , a Great white egret viewable from the public hides. Also our regular Kingfishers . (Photo 4 by Zach Pannifer) ... See MoreSee Less

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3 months ago

Beddington Farmlands

A few pictures from yesterday's Save the Lapwings demonstration and walk at Beddington Farmlands
A bit more on blog here: peteralfreybirdingnotebook.blogspot.com/2020/08/save-lapwing-walk-beddington-farmlands.html
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3 months ago

Beddington Farmlands

STILL SPACES AVAILABLE ON TOMORROW'S (SATURDAY 29th AUGUST) LAPWING WALK (FREE) AT BEDDINGTON FARMLANDS
Meet at 10 am at Beddington Park London Road, Car Park.
Walk lasts 1.5 hours.
Come and learn about the local Lapwings and see other wildlife.
Please book via PM this page or email littleoakgroup@btinternet.com
More details on website: bfnr.org.uk/2020/08/save-the-lapwings/
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Many thanks to our friends for their support of Beddington Farmlands Nature Reserve

BioRegional

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Beddington Farm Bird Group

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British Trust for Ornithology

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